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Boulder Movers


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#1 Daddydano

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 08:14 PM

I am trying to find out what the best cart would be to move boulders that just don't want to give up the laws of gravity but the client wants etched. I have found several brands but thought hey...We should have one or two folks here who might have an idea or two. Since Jimbo has failed us in mass producing the boulder cart 5000 (okay that is a made up name but the cart is real). Let me know what ideas or thoughts you have.

Here is what I have found:

Looks pretty beefy. I like the idea of making it into a heavy duty cart.
http://www.kidsattra...t-capacity.html

Not bad. Not sure if those thin wires would last with the odd shape rocks.
http://www.gemplers....600-lb-Capacity

Also not a bad idea.
http://www.amleo.com...apacity/p/22GP/

#2 cutme

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 09:50 PM

in my opinion, there is no replacement for a good crane.

bb
bruce blessing is my name, and being creative is my game...

the information contained in my posts is worth exactly what you paid for it. you are welcome to pm me for a full refund if you are not entirely satisfied with your purchase.

#3 Ray

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 08:31 AM

Crane is the way to go if you can afford one. But lifting a smooth round boulder is always interesting. I have had good luck with a telescoping trypod with a 1 ton chain hoist. You simply set the tripod up where the stone goes, bach your pickup or trailer under it, lift the stone, pull vehicle away and let the stone down.
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#4 Bernie

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 12:16 PM

if using a dolly ... heavy duty tires are a must and a larger than normal foot would be best. Watch the welds on the dolly
frame.

there are special dollies for moving rock with or without a brake ... I think Granite City Tool may have one on their website.
They aren't cheap.

I like the looks of this telescoping tripod Ray has used. I have no clue how to even set one up.

Has anyone used one of those engine hoists?

Bernie





#5 MAvtistic

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 12:16 PM

After having this for a couple years I finally got it mounted and working, already have used it for more than loading rocks.
Attached File  crane.jpg   681.76KB   43 downloads

we have used it to move my brothers old laser out of the building, load on trailer and haul to new location and unload, also used it to lift the concrete lid off the septic at my parents church.

still have to repaint it but I am happy to get it working. lots easier to set rocks now. its rated @ a ton but I figure that is just a suggestion LOL.... I ask my dad about what he thought it would pick up and he said "just try and if something breaks then we will just rebuilt it stronger"........ hmmm wonder where I get my I can do anything attitude.



oh and one of these come in handy also

Attached File  forklift.jpg   772.03KB   36 downloads

MArk

Edited by MAvtistic, 14 April 2012 - 12:20 PM.

MArk

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#6 Bernie

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 12:23 PM

Just got to love that kind of equipment!

Bernie



#7 ddp224

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 08:16 PM

I picked up a used tree dolly from a landscaping outfit that can haul boulders way bigger than I can possibly muscle around. It's a heavy duty dolly with riding-lawn-mower type wheels that's made for moving trees about for planting. Most of my stone wall building pals around the world use them for positioning base stone boulders. I paid $200 used and they go for about $600 new. They won't handle the monster stones that Mark's equipment can handle but it's helped me out moving countless stone slabs and boulders.
Dan

#8 Daddydano

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 08:47 PM

Dan,

How big/heavy are the boulders you can move with the tree dolly?

#9 Daddydano

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 10:00 AM

Thanks for all the input. I WISH I could have a crane! One step at a time I guess. I think I will call the garden centers and the like and see if they have a ball cart they don't use. This is going to be a fun year with some tasks I have never undertaken on such a larger scale. Of course like I say to others, I will be posting pics when I undertake them.

#10 ddp224

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 11:52 AM

I've moved 600-700 pound stones with the tree dolly. I uploaded a picture of the dolly. It can handle any stone I've been able to get into it. Sometimes the only trouble is finding a helper to lever the dolly back and push it around when the stone is too big for me to handle alone.
Dan

#11 Daddydano

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 01:50 PM

I don't see your picture but that does help me with knowing about how heavy we can go with the dollys. At 300 plus lbs I might have the leverage needed wink.gif.
Thanks Dan for the input.

#12 ddp224

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 08:38 PM

Sorry, I couldn't get the picture uploaded here. I think the picture has too many megabytes. Picture a dolly on steroids.

Attached Files



#13 Daddydano

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:41 PM

I think we have a winner. something like that would really be useful. I do like the four wheeled mover I found in the first link but 600 bucks is a little high for me I think. Did a search and found nothing used in my area so I might have to spring for a new one.

#14 mudpine39

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 01:03 PM

I'm a little late to jump in to this conversation, and there have been many good suggestions so far.

One other option to consider is an ATV log skidder type of device, pulled with an atv or old rider mower.

I built one with a shortened tongue. Tows behind my old 18hp lawn tractor nicely. Picks up a big load with the proper hoist.

I don't have a picture but you can google ATV Log skidder and you'll get the idea.





#15 Daddydano

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Posted 01 May 2012 - 09:06 PM

Thanks I will give it a google and check it out. THANKS!




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